News & Announcements

Jun 26, 2015

Homeschoolers and Public School Virtual Classes

There has been a lot of confusion about the status of homeschool students who take public school virtual classes. The confusion began when Iredell County began to offer NC virtual classes to homeschool students in 2012, and the confusion increased when NC virtual charter schools began recruiting students for this fall. After consulting with Katie Cornetto (Staff Attorney, State Board of Education), Bill Peaslee (General Counsel, NC Department of Administration) and Connie Joiner (NC Virtual Public School), I have an answer to the question, “Can a student participate in these programs and still be considered a homeschool student?”

NC Virtual Charter Schools
These schools are like brick and mortar charter schools, except all classes are taken online via the Internet. They are chartered by the NC State Board of Education, have a non-profit board of directors independent of the local school district, and they are public schools. NC approved the North Carolina Virtual Academy (with curriculum supplied by the for-profit K-12, Inc) and the North Carolina Connections Academy (with curriculum provided by the for-profit Connections Education, LLC, which is owned by the UK-based Pearson PLC). While K-12, Inc also provides virtual homeschool curriculum, there is no connection between the North Carolina Virtual Academy and homeschooling. Even though they are taking all their classes at home, students in these schools are public school students and can’t be homeschool students for three reasons.

  1. The state provides funding for every student in the virtual charter school. The qualification that allows homeschools to operate as nonpublic schools is stated in Part 2 of article 39 Chapter 115C of the NC statutes. “It receives no funding from the State of North Carolina. (1979, c. 506; 1981, c. 423, s. 1.)”
  2. The scope and sequence of academic instruction is not determined by the student’s parents, legal guardians or member of the household as required by the state definition of homeschool contained in Part 3 of article 39 Chapter 115C of the NC statutes.
  3. There is no provision in NC statutes allowing a student to be dually enrolled as a public school student and as a nonpublic school student.

NC Virtual Public School Classes
These classes were designed for NC public school students, but there is a provision in the statute that allows nonpublic school students to take these courses. Enrollment can be through local school districts that opt to allow for nonpublic school students to enroll for classes, or it can be through the NC Virtual Public School website.

Through Local School Districts
If a homeschool student enrolls in a class through the local school district and wants to maintain his homeschool status, he is limited to one class per semester, and the homeschool must pay the tuition for the class. If the student enrolls in two or more classes through the school district, the tuition for those classes will be paid for by the school district using state per-pupil funds. By receiving funding from the state, the student is enrolled as a public school student.

Through NC Virtual Public School Website
By enrolling for classes via the NC Virtual Public School website, the student can sign up for as many classes as he can handle (normally four classes is considered a full load). The homeschool will pay the tuition for each class the student takes. The new 2013 definition of homeschool now allows the student to take core curriculum.

Community College Dual Enrollment
The question often arises about how homeschool students are allowed to take community college classes tuition free since they are then taking money from the state. Dual enrolment statutes were passed after the nonpublic school statutes were passed, and the dual enrollment funding was specifically designated for all high school juniors and seniors, public and nonpublic students, who qualified for the program.

 

Apr 1, 2015

Legislative Update

Immunization Bill 

North Carolina Senators Tarte, Barringer, Van Duyn, Bryant, Robinson and Smith filed Senate Bill 346, Enact Stricter Immunization Requirements. If enacted, this bill would require all children ages zero through eighteen to receive all immunizations prescribed and by the ages specified by the US Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) in order to attend any school in the state, including homeschool. In addition, all children shall be screened for Severe Combined Immunodeficiency to determine if the child qualifies for a medical exemption. This bill will take away the religious immunization exemption that is currently in the law. Exemptions will only be granted upon a request by a physician licensed to practice medicine in NC. NCHE opposes this bill.

 

The Senate Health Care Committee was scheduled to consider Senate Bill 346 in their meeting on March 31, but the three co-chairmen, Senators Hise, Pate and Tucker, decided not bring the bill up for debate and a vote. This was a major blow to the progress of the bill. Technically, the bill is not dead; it can be brought up at any time for a vote before May 7. Several influential senators have declared their opposition to this bill as has Lt. Governor Forest. Therefore, it is unlikely that it will be brought up again in its present language. NCHE will continue to monitor this bill.

 

Proposal to Move DNPE

NCHE is opposed to the proposed move of DNPE from the Department of Administration to the Governor’s Office. We think it will take away from the stability of this division, and it will politicize this office. This plan would expose DNPE employees to the possibility of being replaced each time a new governor is elected. The NC House is the next step in the budget process. Please contact your NC representative and communicate your thoughts. To find your representative, click here and follow the instructions. 

 

Convention of States

While it is not a homeschool issue, many homeschoolers have inquired about the convention of states movement. Bills H321 and S398 have been filed in the NC House and Senate that, if passed, will have NC call for a convention of states. To learn more about this, here are links supporting the convention and in opposition to the convention.

 

Homeschoolers in Public School Sports and Activities

Senate Bill 649 was filed by Senators Sanderson, Brock and Hise. NCHE has taken a neutral stance on this bill. On one hand, the bill will enable homeschool students to participate in public school sports and other activities (band, drama, etc.) in areas where there are no homeschool opportunities available. On the other hand, to participate, homeschoolers will have to give up the freedom to determine the scope and sequence of instruction and instruction schedule. This bill will give those decisions to the State Board of Education and by proxy to the NC High School Athletic Association in the high school years.

 

Community College Scholarships

NCHE supports the effort to pass House Bill 129, High Achieving Tuition Scholarships. These scholarships will be given to high achieving graduating students, including homeschool graduates, who attend community college. 

Nov 21, 2014

NC Senate Page Program

NCHE received the following information in an email from Senator Chad Barefoot.

“Every legislative session, the North Carolina General Assembly opens its doors to high school students from across the state to participate in the House and Senate Page Programs. It is a great learning opportunity. Students will witness firsthand how an idea becomes a law through the legislative process. They also get a chance to form lifelong friendships with pages from other parts of the state. Each page is appointed by the President Pro Tempore of the Senate upon the recommendation of a Senator and serves for one week when the General Assembly is in session.Pages have the opportunity to perform many duties that a typical staff member would perform for a legislator such as assisting with committee meetings, serving in the Senate Chamber during daily sessions and participating in activities arranged for the enhancement of their overall educational experience.

I highly recommend the program because I served as a page for the NC House of Representatives in 2001. It was a fantastic and unique experience that I will never forget.”

How to Apply

There are only a limited number of slots available each legislative session, so apply now! Email your senator and ask for an application. Your senator will then mail you an application. To learn who your senator is click this link and follow the instructions. http://www.ncleg.net/representation/WhoRepresentsMe.aspx

For more information about the NC page programs click here.

Nov 3, 2014
Law & Policy

Reconceptualizing Prosperity and Early Childhood Education

Kevin McClain, President
North Carolinians for Home Education
​Nov 3, 2014

In an address made on Oct 31, 2014, at Rhode Island College in Providence, President Obama advocated for increased enrollment in early child education programs. According to his remarks, which focused on issues regarding workforce gender equality, too many adults are compelled to leave the workforce and become “stay at home” parents because their children lack access to high quality preschool. The phenomena of two-income families and the “stay at home” parent, however, is far more complex and requires a much more broad discussion of education and labor policies. Policies which uncritically expand childcare and schooling expenditures fail citizens by not taking into account the real benefits of home-based, parent-directed care and implications for the labor market.

A full transcript of the President's remarks is available on the White House website:

Remarks by the President on Women and the Economy -- Providence, RI
http://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2014/10/31/remarks-president-women-and-economy-providence-ri

As part of his remarks, President Obama called for an increase of enrollment of 6 million children in what he labeled “high quality preschool”, saying that preschool is “good for families” and “good for children.” According to the President's remarks, children enrolled in high-quality preschool “will do better.”

“So let’s make this happen.  By the end of this decade, let’s enroll 6 million children in high-quality preschool, and let’s make sure that we are making America stronger.  That is good for families; it’s also good for the children, because we know investing in high-quality early childhood education makes all the difference in the world, and those kids will do better.”

President Obama's remarks concerning the benefits of preschool followed a statement in which he empathized with families who feel it necessary for one member, most often a woman, to leave the labor force in order to “stay at home.” A decision to temporarily leave the labor force has a long-term impact on a person's earning potential:

“... too often, parents have no choice but to put their kids in cheaper daycare that maybe doesn’t have the kinds of programming that makes a big difference in a child’s development.  And sometimes there may just not be any slots, or the best programs may be too far away.  And sometimes, someone, usually mom, leaves the workplace to stay home with the kids, which then leaves her earning a lower wage for the rest of her life as a result.  And that’s not a choice we want Americans to make.”

Like the President, North Carolinians want “America to be stronger.” This requires engaging the wide range of evidence concerning early childhood education. Researchers have provided significant scientific evidence challenging claims that formal early childhood education provides any lasting cognitive, psychological, or social benefit. In contrast, research indicates that early exposure to more structured educational programs can have negative effect on later learning and relationships. In 1975, Dr Raymond S. Moore and Dorothy Moore published “Better Late Than Early” and cited over 3000 scientific publications which challenged the claims made by early childhood education advocates. 

Dr. Moore resigned from a job in the Department of Education over what he deemed to be politically-motivated rather than scientifically-backed arguments for policies advocating for preschool expansion. The advocacy of the Moores, and others like them, launched the modern homeschool movement. For over thirty years North Carolinians for Home Education (NCHE) has advocated for education policies which acknowledge the benefits to society of home-based education and eschew an uncritical embrace of daycare and early schooling. Researchers today continue to provide evidence which challenges the educational theories which resulted in our modern institutions and policies of daycare and k-12 schooling. While statistics for the numbers of preschool age children in homeschools are lacking, it is estimated that over 100,000 children in North Carolina are educated at home and in 2013 more North Carolinians choose to homeschool their children rather than enroll them in private schools.

The modern homeschool movement developed as a direct result of educational policies which devalued the contributions families make to society and the value of home-based learning. North Carolinians for Home Education encourages policy-makers in North Carolina and beyond to examine the evidence supporting the rejection of early childhood programs and modern schooling and better understand the motivation behind many parents who “stay at home.”

North Carolinians for Home Education shares with the President and policy-makers concern regarding the value of women's labor in the market. Stated simply: equal work deserves equal compensation. However, we implore elected leaders and pundits to broaden civic discourse about the ramifications of labor, family and educational policies. Recognizing the value of providing a stable environment for the next generation of American citizens should be part of any discussion concerning education and labor. Research and experience provides ample evidence that a stable home environment facilitates strong interpersonal relationships yielding significant gains in emotional and cognitive growth and social development. As such, parents who “stay at home” and families that choose to embrace a single-income lifestyle contribute greatly to the prosperity of our society. 

The American public needs leaders who can speak to a more robust concept of prosperity and statecraft that reflects the reality that adults are more than simply laborers, and children need far more than simply more schooling. Americans need more discussion of what it means and what it takes to develop healthy future generations.

-----

Support NCHE in its mission! Give Today! 

Jun 21, 2014

2014 NCHE Athletic Commission State Baseball Championships

The 2014 NCHEAC State Championship was claimed by the Wake Warriors. In the first semi-final, the Forsyth Hawks jumped out to an early 5 run lead before the Cabarrus Stallions, on the strength of a 5 run 5th inning, squeaked out a 7-6 win. The second semi-final saw the Wake Warriors win against the Asheville Trailblazers 2-0 on the strength of a 3 hit shut-out by Jonathan Gardner. The Asheville Trailblazers then overcame a 3-0 deficit to win over the Forsyth Hawks, 12-3. The championship game was a tight contest with neither Cabarrus nor Wake being able to develop a dominant lead in this pitcher’s duel. Wake took a 2 run lead in the top of the fifth, mainly on station to station hitting with Cabarrus countering with 1 run in the bottom of the same frame to set-up a 3-2 Warriors lead. The Cabarrus Stallions then tied the score at 3-3 on an infield hit in the bottom of the 6th. Matthew Smyth of the Warriors scored the go ahead run on a sacrifice fly in the top of the 7th followed by 4 more insurance runs. Josh Holt pitched 6 1/3 innings for the Stallions, and Jordan Paxton pitched 5 innings and was relieved by Drew Boyd for the final 2 innings with runners aboard and no one out in the bottom of the 6th. The Wake Warriors won on a final score of 8-3. 

All-Tournament Team
Wake Warriors -- Champions
Jordan Paxton
Matthew Smyth 
Jonathan Gardner
Len Gardner

Cabarrus Stallions – Runner-ups
Hunter Shepherd
Dalton Lankford
Sawyer Strickland

Asheville Trailblazers – Consolation Winners
Turner Warren
Ian Fleming

Forsyth Hawks – 4th Place
Tyler Cox

Mar 19, 2014

NCHE Athletic Conference Teams Return to Top Division at the East Coast Championships

The NCHEAC State Champion varsity girls team, the GC Heat of Greensboro, won the top division at the East Coast Basketball Championships at Liberty University on March 12-15 with the Durham Flight finishing in 3rd place and Surry Runnin’ Patriots in 8th place in the top division. In the boys varsity top division, the Cabarrus Stallions finished in 4th place. 

Also winning championships were the South Wake Sabres of Cary in the Middle School Girls Division, Durham Flight won the Varsity Boys 5A division, North Wake of New Life Camp won the Varsity Girls 4A division, Wake Forest (Lighthouse) won the Varsity Boys 3A and JV A, and North Wake of New Life Camp won the Varsity Boys A division. The Cabarrus Stallions placed 3rd in the Girls Varsity 4A division and Wake Forest 4th in the Varsity Girls 2A. The South Wake Sabres finished in 3rd place in the Boys Varsity 5A and were 4th in the JV 2A, while the JV A division the Forsyth Hawks of Winston-Salem placed 3rd.

2014 East Coast Basketball Championships Results

Program

Division

Place

GC-Heat (Greensboro)

Varsity Girls Top Division

Champion

Durahm Flight

Varsity Girls Top Division

4th Place

Surry Runnin' Patriots

Varsity Girls Top Division

8th Place

        (Surry County)

   
     

Cabarrus Stallions

Varsity Boys Top Division

4th Place

         (Cabarrus County)

   
     

Durham Flight

Varsity Boys 5A

Champion

South Wake Sabres (Cary)

Varsity Boys 5A

3rd Place

     

North Wake (New Life Camp)

Varsity Girls 4A

Champion

Cabarrus Stallions

Varsity Girls 4A

3rd Place

     

Wake Forest (Lighthouse)

Varsity Boys 3A

Champion

     

Wake Forest (Lighthouse)

Varsity Girls 2A

4th Place

     

South Wake Sabres (Cary)

JV Boys 2A

4th Place

     

South Wake Sabres (Cary)

JV Girls

2nd Place

     

Forsyth Hawks (Winston-Salem)

JV Boys A

3rd Place

Wake Forest (Lighthouse)

JV Boys A

 
     

South Wake Sabres (Cary)

Middle School Girls

Champion

Mar 15, 2014

En garde! Fencers Ready?

In August of 2009, Tammy Reid contacted Walter Triplette, owner of Triplette Competition Arms in Elkin, about teaching fencing in her area. He referred her to John Myers, a former student, who was willing to come to Winston to teach.

By 2012 six teams went to competition in the state public high school league but still were not able to compete in a state tournament. This frustration was the inspiration to form a homeschool league.

In the fall of 2013 NCHEAC, with the help of Tammy Reid and Walter Triplette, as technical consultant, started with five coaches willing to have teams from Asheville to Wilmington. Four tournaments were hosted by GC-Heat in Greensboro as well as the final “A” team tournament and individual tournament.

The “A” team tournament was held February 8. The winners of the “A” team tournament were Surry Home Educators. The winners of the individual tournament were Allison Brown (Girls Division), Sam Cason (1st), Josh Clark (2nd) and Zach Brown (3rd).

The focus in 2014 will be to build the sport and league even more. We will host some training sessions to be announced after the NCHE Conference in May.

Mar 5, 2014

2014 State Homeschool Basketball Tournament: 6 New State Champions Crowned

The 14th Annual State Basketball Championships were held at Greensboro College with a number of first-time state champions crowned. In the varsity boys division, the Asheville Trailblazers won their 2nd varsity boys crown. The Greensboro program, GC-Heat, won their 1st girls state championship. First-time champions were crowned in the JV Girls division, by 1st year Chatham County Thunder, being victorious. In the middle school boys division, North Wake won. In the middle school girls division, the GC-Heat from Greensboro repeated for the 2nd season. Repeating for the 4th year in a row in the JV Boys were the Asheville Trailblazers.

Pictured: Asheville Trailblazer varsity boys winning team      

  The results of the semi-final, consolation and championship games are below:

Semi-Final Games

       

Semi-Final Games

 
                     

JVG

31

Greensboro 

Chatham

33

 

MSG

31

Durham

South Wake

24

JVG

34

Wake Forest

North Wake

42

 

MSG

31

Greensboro

Wake Forest

21

JVB

38

South Wake

Cabarrus

40

 

MSB

45

North Wake

Greensboro

34

 

 

       Maroon

     

 

 

     

JVB

71

Asheville

So. Wake White

19

 

MSB

52

Cabarrus

South Wake

58

VG

47

Durham

Cabarrus

43

           

VG

49

Greensboro

North Wake

38

           

VB

42

Durham

Cabarrus

34

           

VB

62

Asheville

South Wake

33

           
                     

Championship  Games

     

Consolation  Games

   
                     

MSG

25

Durham

Greensboro

29

 

MSG

20

South Wake

Wake Forest

21

MSB

39

North Wake

South Wake

29

 

MSB

37

Greensboro

Cabarrus

42

JVG

28

Chatham

North Wake

24

 

JVG

36

Greensboro

Wake Forest

35

JVB

62

Asheville

Cabarrus

40

 

JVB

56

South Wake

South Wake

32

 

 

       

 

 

     Maroon

     White

 

VG

30

Durham

Greensboro

32

 

VG

50

North Wake

Cabarrus

36

VB

35

Durham

Asheville

71

 

VB

60

South Wake

Cabarrus

66

 

2014 NCHEAC State All-Tournament Teams

           
                       

MS Girls

       

MS Boys

       
 

Greensboro

     

North Wake

 
   

Lauren Bevis, MVP

     

Paul Storey, MVP

   

Britta Hilton

     

Campbell Suffridge

   

Lydia Stucker

     

Drew Moore

 
 

Durham

       

South Wake

 
   

Hannah Geerts

     

Luke Chambers

 
   

Tirzah Lloyd

     

Joseph Dalola

 
 

Wake Forest

     

Cabarrus

     
   

Isabel Nobles

     

Jordan Kalenian

 

South Wake

     

Greensboro

 
   

Kenzie Hart

     

Joey Van Eerden

                       

JV Girls

       

JV Boys

       
 

Chatham

       

Asheville

     
   

Bethany West

     

Paul Rennard, MVP

   

Cassidy Shoun

     

John Blum

 
   

Hannah St. Jean

     

Samuel Rennard

 

North Wake

     

Cabarrus

     
   

Ally Stone

       

Bailey Benham

 
   

Brittany Stone

     

Dalton Lankford

 

Greensboro

     

South Wake Maroon

 
   

Tia McCutcheon

     

Noah Wilson

 
 

Wake Forest

     

South Wake White

 
   

Jaeda Jennings

     

Seth Shearin

 

Varsity Girls

     

Varsity Boys

     
 

Greensboro

     

Asheville

     
   

Hannah Van Eerden, MVP

     

Charles Blum, MVP

   

Jordan Lanier

     

Holder Mills

 
   

Madison Whitt

     

Nathan Rennard

 

Durham

       

Durham

     
   

Rebecca Lobach

     

David Senerchia

   

Stormi Abernathy

     

Carrson Oakley

 
 

North Wake

     

Cabarrus

     
   

Emily Stone

     

Rockford Stoller

 

Cabarrus

       

South Wake

 
   

Alayna Long

     

Nathaniel Sprecher

 

Feb 28, 2014

February Frenzy, AKA East and West Basketball Regionals

The East and West Basketball Regionals were delayed but not knocked out by Winter Storm Pax.

     The NCHE Athletic Commission (NCHEAC) East and West Basketball Regionals were delayed until Feb. 21-22 with the state finals being delayed to Feb. 28-Mar.1. In spite of the storm, there were very exciting games and a number of teams advanced to the state finals for the first time.

     Here are the scoring results along with seedings and schedules for the NCHEAC State Tournament in Greensboro:

East

Regional

 

 

 

 

JVB

Chatham

58

 

Durham

69

MSG

Durham

35

 

North Wake

  26

MSG

South Wake

18

 

Wake Forest

  24

 

 

 

 

 

 

MSB

Wilmington

34

 

Harnett

10

MSB

North Wake

53

 

Alamance

17

MSB

Wake Forest

31

 

Durham

33

JVB

Wake Forest

57

 

East Wake

44

JVB

S. Wake (White)

59

 

Wilmington

25

JVB

Alamance

61

 

Durham

45

JVG

Goldsboro

20

 

South Wake

27

VB

Goldsboro

71

 

Harnett

52

MSB

North Wake

47

 

Wilmington

17

MSB

South Wake

39

 

Durham

18

JVB

S. Wake (Maroon)

69

 

Wake Forest

44

JVB

Alamance

47

 

S. Wake (White)

48

JVG

Chatham

45

 

North Wake

43

VB

South Wake

41

 

Wake Forest

40

JVG

Wake Forest

46

 

South Wake

28

VB

Durham

60

 

Goldsboro

58

 

 

 

 

 

 

MSG

South Wake

35

 

North Wake

22

JVG

North Wake

51

 

South Wake

35

MSG

Durham

19

 

Wake Forest

14

MSB

South Wake

35

 

North Wake

36

JVG

Wake Forest

43

 

Chatham

37

JVB

S. Wake (Maroon)

48

 

S. Wake (White)

32

VG

Durham

55

 

North Wake

37

VB

South Wake

53

 

Durham

55

 

 

MSB

VG

 

West Regional

           

JVB

VB

 

 

 

 

       

Fri 2/21

                 

8:30 AM

1

 

JVB Greensboro

59

 

JVB Surry

53

   

9:45 AM

2

 

MSB Cabarrus

55

 

MSB Forsyth

34

   

11:00 PM

3

 

MSB Greensboro

23

 

MSB Asheville

19

   

12:15 PM

4

 

JVB Asheville

84

 

JVB Greensboro

52

   
       

 

 

       

1:00 PM

5

 

JVB Forsyth

43

 

JVB Cabarrus

65

   

2:30 PM

6

 

VB Cabarrus

96

 

VB Hickory

78

   
       

 

 

   

Number 1 seed to

Number 2 seed to

       

 

 

   

State Tournament

State Tournament

9:00 AM

7

 

MSB Greensboro

26

 

Cabarrus

43

Cabarrus

Greensboro

10:30 AM

8

 

VG Cabarrus

42

 

VG Surry

41

   

Noon

9

 

VG Greensboro

58

 

VG Asheville

38

   

1:30 PM

10

 

VB Asheville

92

 

VB High Point

29

   

3:00 PM

11

 

VB Greensboro

60

 

VB Cabarrus

75

   

4:30 PM

12

 

JVB Asheville

70

 

JVB Cabarrus

36

Asheville

Cabarrus

6:00 PM

13

 

VG Greensboro

80

 

VG Cabarrus

30

Greensboro

Cabarrus

7:30 PM

14

 

VB Asheville

61

 

VB Cabarrus

56

Asheville

Cabarrus

 

 

 

 

NCHEAC State Basketball Championships

 

Hanes Gym @ Corner of W. McGee & Fulton St.

     

Bryan YMCA @ 501 W. Market St.

     

Feb. 28

             

1

10:30

 

JVG

Greensboro 

Chatham

11:00

2

 

MSG

Durham

South Wake

3

11:45

 

JVG

Wake Forest

North Wake

12:15

4

 

MSG

Greensboro

Wake Forest

5

1:15

 

JVB

So. Wake Maroon

Cabarrus

1:45

6

 

MSB

North Wake

Greensboro

7

2:30

 

JVB

Asheville

So. Wake White

3:00

8

 

MSB

Cabarrus

South Wake

9

4:00

 

VG

Durham

Cabarrus

           

10

5:30

 

VG

Greensboro

North Wake

           

11

7:00

 

VB

Durham

Cabarrus

           

12

8:30

 

VB

Asheville

South Wake

           
                       
     

Mar. 1

         

Greensboro Day School

 

Hanes Gym @ Corner of W. McGee & Fulton St.

     

Lawndale Dr.

 

13

10:30

 

MSG

Highest Seed

Lowest Seed

10:00

14

 

MSG

   

15

12:00

 

MSB

Highest Seed

Lowest Seed

11:15

16

 

MSB

   

17

1:30

 

JVG

Highest Seed

Lowest Seed

12:30

18

 

JVG

   

19

3:00

 

JVB

Highest Seed

Lowest Seed

2:00

20

 

JVB

   

21

5:00

 

VG

Highest Seed

Lowest Seed

3:30

22

 

VG

   

23

7:00

 

VB

Highest Seed

Lowest Seed

5:00

24

 

VB

   
                       
       

* East will be home team unless meeting a higher

   
       

    seed from the West

           

 

Feb 25, 2014

Author of Article Calling for Homeschool Regulation Is New Employee of DNPE

On February 21, NCHE learned that a new employee of the NC Division of Non-Public Education (DNPE) had written an article, before being hired, advocating for more homeschool regulation. NCHE started working immediately to get clarification from DNPE and the new employee. We also contacted friends in the NC General Assembly. We expressed our concerns. One influential friend in the NC General Assembly assured us that any attempt to add homeschool regulation during the 2014 short session will be blocked. 

This employee in DNPE is Jessica Sammons. She received a juris doctorate degree from Campbell Law School and passed the North Carolina Bar Association exam in September 2013. Her new position is educational consultant, and she will work with private schools.

While she was a law student, Jessica was given an assignment in a litigation class. Her professor told Jessica that she should apply the court decisions of the Leandro Case to homeschools. (You may remember that five low wealth counties sued the state and six wealthier counties saying that the education funding system for public schools was creating an unequal and inadequate education in poor counties by relying on local property taxes to supplement state funding for necessary expenses, and they won in the NC Supreme Court.) Jessica did so even though she thought the Leandro Case had no bearing on homeschools. The paper suggested that the General Assembly should add more regulation to the current homeschool law. Her professor made the NC Bar Association aware of the paper because she believed it to be a well written paper. They contacted Jessica and asked if they could publish the paper more than a year ago.

While this article raised NCHE’s concerns, Jessica has said that the paper was to fulfill a class assignment and that it does not reflect her opinion of home education. Here is a link to the paper she wrote. http://educationlaw.ncbar.org/newsletters/educationlawnov2013/homeschooled

No employee of DNPE has the authority to add regulation to homeschool law. However, they can make things more difficult for homeschoolers. DNPE director, David Mills, stated that he and Kristy Daughtry will be doing the record review meetings with homeschools and that Jessica will be looking at private school records. He has assured NCHE that his office will not make things more difficult for homeschoolers.