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Homeschool History

The Delconte Case: The First Step in NC Homeschool Freedom

For a quarter of a century, home educators in North Carolina have found it relatively easy to comply with our homeschool law. Anybody who has had much contact with the Division of Non-Public Education (DNPE) has learned that everybody there is homeschool friendly. This atmosphere goes a long way to make dealing with North Carolina state authorities a generally pleasant experience.

NCHE Celebrates Thirty Years of Legal Homeschooling in North Carolina

In the spring of 1985, a significant victory took place in the long legal fight over home education in North Carolina. The North Carolina State Supreme Court ruled that under the current private school law, parents were allowed to educate their children at home.

Classifying Homeschoolers

You are a homeschooler, sure, but what KIND of homeschooler are you? What is your motive, your educational philosophy, your methodology? Educational philosophers and historians struggle to comprehend the homeschool movement because it is so diverse!  This workshop will look at some of the major frameworks educational philosophers and historians use to classify, discuss and evaluate the diversity that exists with the homeschool movement.  Understanding these frameworks, and their associated labels, in useful for developing one's own practices.

Three Homeschool Movement Founders and their Legacies

The modern homeschool movement is now 30 years old, but how did we get here?  Educational historians identify several key individuals who were instrumental in advancing the movement. These individuals came from very different backgrounds and had very different views.   Many homeschoolers, however, do not recognize their names nor their legacies. This talk will introduce and discuss the contribution of three individuals who wrote books and created organizations dedicated to promoting their own vision of education: John Holt, Raymond and Dorothy Moore and Rousa Rushdoony.   

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