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Never Too Old to Continue to Learn

I have always loved learning new things. While my children were still at home, I learned how to run sound (for my church), how to buy stocks (for a stock club) and Latin (just for fun). These were topics that I initially knew absolutely nothing about—I was definitely a “Greek to me” novice.

How to Study Science as Leonardo da Vinci

What do Leonardo da Vinci, Mark Twain, Thomas Edison, Marie Curie, Thomas Jefferson and John D. Rockefeller have in common? Not all of these individuals were professional scientists, but all of them used the same simple tool of scientific inquiry to pursue their passions: a notebook.

Leonardo da Vinci’s scientific notebook is perhaps the most famous. The Renaissance artist’s “Codex Arundel” was handwritten in Italian and features mirror writing (legible only when held up to a mirror), diagrams of the human body and sketches for flying machines, catapults and other devices.i

Remembering Fortitude: The Life and Methods of Charlotte Mason

It’s that time of year. Suddenly you no longer care about the Cheerios on the floor, the workbooks begging for attention in their little pile, or how many Latin verbs your teenager can conjugate. You have reached the end of the school year, and despite how many unchecked tasks and goals may remain on your monthly planner, nature is telling you to pause and seek renewal

Classifying Homeschoolers

You are a homeschooler, sure, but what KIND of homeschooler are you? What is your motive, your educational philosophy, your methodology? Educational philosophers and historians struggle to comprehend the homeschool movement because it is so diverse!  This workshop will look at some of the major frameworks educational philosophers and historians use to classify, discuss and evaluate the diversity that exists with the homeschool movement.  Understanding these frameworks, and their associated labels, in useful for developing one's own practices.

Why I’m Passionate about Unschooling

My name is Melissa, and I’m an unschooler. I will admit that I’m more comfortable saying that now than I ever have been. These days nobody blinks at the idea of homeschooling. But I usually get some sort of reaction to telling people that we unschool. Sometimes it’s genuine curiosity. (Really? What is unschooling?) Sometimes, it’s confusion. (How will your kids learn to speak if you don’t teach them grammar?) Sometimes, it’s good-hearted teasing by family members who think I’m just a little bit nuts.

The Math around You: Helping Young Children Learn to Think Mathematically

Despite popular opinion, math is not a creation of evil masterminds plotting the demise of students and mothers everywhere. I often get the feeling from comments I hear and read that many people think that math isn’t a natural part of our lives, that it’s boring and that it’s something that we just have to make our kids do simply because we’re expected to. None of these things is true—math is all around us! Just as we learn more about God through nature, music and art, we learn about God through math. It’s part of the world that He created!

Why We Love Classical Education

Classical education is distinguished from other models of education in at least three ways. First, classical education recognizes and embraces three stages of learning and seeks to teach in accordance with those stages. Second, it values history, especially the great conversations of the past, and places a priority on helping students benefit from and engage with those great ideas. Third, classical education values education for its own sake and seeks to develop students who are well-rounded with a wide breadth of knowledge across many disciplines.

Why I Am Passionate about Charlotte Mason

Many factors may influence our decisions on educational curriculum, including our own journey through life. As a product of traditional public schooling, where my pursuit of high scores on tests outweighed any personal development, I found that delving into the hows and whys of learning was not intuitive. Furthermore, the concept of homeschooling never entered my mind until our twins were approaching kindergarten. As we looked into options other than a full day of school, God opened doors and windows to the Charlotte Mason philosophy.

Three Goals for Your First Year of Homeschooling

I have noticed that successful new homeschoolers generally accomplish three goals in their first year.

Math: It's a Team Sport

However, when studying math, most children miss a strong grounding in the ability to think for themselves. They get into the rut of just doing what the math book tells them to do when they see a certain type of problem. This rut can be not only boring, but it can stunt their intellectual growth...